Columbus State University Print Logo

College of Education and Health Professions

College of Education and Health Professions

Professional Education Unit Assessment Handbook

III. Alignment of Conceptual Framework and Programs with Standards

Initial Programs

The Conceptual Framework is closely aligned with the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) Principles, which influence the planning of initial teacher preparation programs. Initial programs are geared toward developing high levels of proficiency among beginning teachers. The faculty recognizes that InTASC Standards provide common ground for cross-program planning and assessment of candidates. The relationship of InTASC principles to individual program goals, the latter sensitive to and/or derived from the guidelines of specialty organizations, is made clear in a series of analytical matrices in individual program reports and in the assessment instrument used to evaluate teacher candidates' performance. The assessment instrument, the Model of Appropriate Practice (MAP) for Teacher Candidates, was created by the Educator Preparation Faculty in Academic Year 2000-2001 [followed by revisions as needed / current revisions in progress 2017] and infused into all preservice teacher education courses in Fall 2001. The MAP assessment outlines the skills beginning teachers should demonstrate and is correlated with InTASC Standards.

Advanced Programs

Advanced educator preparation programs in the COEHP and COA are influenced by national standards appropriate to each program. In teacher education, the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) Core Propositions and specialty association standards serve to shape decisions regarding advanced programs. The NBPTS propositions not only define accomplished teaching, but also influence initial programs which are based on the idea that candidates move through identifiable stages toward increasingly higher levels of performance, toward accomplished teaching which distinguishes Board-certified professionals. The specialty association standards are highly influential in planning each individual program, both initial (for example, in early childhood, science education, and other majors) and advanced. The School Counseling program is influenced by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) Standards and American School Counselor Association (ASCA) National Standards while the Educational Leadership program is guided by the Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (PSEL) and the 2015 Georgia Educational Leadership Standards. The Conceptual Framework is closely aligned with the standards in each of these areas.

Alignment of Conceptual Framework with InTASC Principles and NBPTS Standards

Learning Outcomes (Teaching):

  • Teachers employ best practice that leads to improved student learning. (InTASC Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8; NBPTS Standards 1, 2, 3)
  • Teachers use technology to enhance teaching and learning (InTASC Standards 4, 7, 8; NBPTS Standards 1, 2, 3)
  • Teachers use a variety of tools and strategies to address the needs of diverse learners (InTASC Standards 1, 2, 6, 8; NBPTS Standards 1, 2, 3)
  • Teachers continually reflect on their practice (InTASC Standard 9; NBPTS Standard 4)
  • Teachers collaborate within communities of learning (InTASC Standard 10; NBPTS Standard 5; CACREP School Standard B)
  • Counselors and leaders create and maintain safe and supportive school environments that promote accomplished teaching and high levels of learning (CACREP School Standard A)
  • Counselors improve student learning by promoting the academic, career, and social development of students (ASCA Standards I, II, III)

Learning Outcomes (Scholarship):

  • Teachers, counselors, and leaders know their fields and are able to apply their knowledge to help students learn (InTASC Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8; NBPTS Standards 1, 2, 3; CACREP School Standard A)
  • Teachers, counselors, and leaders continually construct, examine, and reflect upon knowledge and use that knowledge to improve teaching and learning (InTASC Standard 9; NBPTS Standard 4)
  • Teachers, counselors, and leaders are members of multiple learning communities (InTASC Standard 10; NBPTS Standard 5; CACREP School Standard B)
  • Teachers, counselors, and leaders understand and build upon the diversity of students, families, and communities (InTASC Standards 2, 5, 10; NBPTS Standard 1; CACREP School Standard A)

Learning Outcomes (Professionalism):

  • Teachers, counselors, and leaders know and can explain important principles and concepts delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards (InTASC Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10; NBPTS Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
  • Teachers, counselors, and leaders can apply professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards to facilitate student learning (InTASC Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10; NBPTS Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
  • Teachers, counselors, and leaders reflect the dispositions delineated in professional, state, and institutional standards (InTASC Standards 9, 10; NBPTS Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
  • Teachers, counselors, and leaders are members of learned societies and professional organizations (InTASC Standards 9, 10; NBPTS Standards 5)
  • Teachers, counselors, and leaders focus on student learning (InTASC Principles 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10; NBPTS Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5; CACREP School Standard A)